Sunday 30 April 2017


King Charles III review at Everyman Theatre

Rating: 3.5/5

Peppered with Shakespearean allusions, raising timely topics, and providing plenty to talk about, SoGlos heads to the Olivier award-winning play, King Charles III, at Cheltenham's Everyman Theatre.

The Olivier award-winning play, King Charles III took to the stage of Cheltenham’s Everyman Theatre on Monday 29 February 2016, offering up a clever, timely, yet at times, gimmicky, performance.

Starting with the solemn event of the Queen’s funeral, the Everyman’s packed auditorium was thrust into a not-so-distant future, in which the Prince of Wales stood to fulfil the long-awaited role of King.

During his first few weeks in the throne, King Charles III, played expertly by Robert Powell, refuses to sign a bill from parliament which is attempting to control what the press can write; an issue which is hotly debated both on stage and off.

Peppered with satire and providing a razor-sharp commentary on society, the play boasted some excellent, well-timed jokes. However, some humour, such as Prince Harry’s excitement at going to Sainsbury’s for a scotch egg with his ‘normal’, left-wing girlfriend, felt a bit forced, like someone was holding up a ‘laugh’ prompt card.


Peppered with satire and providing a razor-sharp commentary on society, the play boasted some excellent, well-timed jokes.


Bursting with Shakespearean allusions, the play tied in nicely with the Bard’s 400th anniversary year, with elements of everything from King Lear and Macbeth to Romeo and Juliet and Othello.

As a huge Shakespeare fan, I delighted in pointing these out, but at times I found it fell flat. In particular, the scenes of Diana’s ghostly apparitions – alluding to King Duncan in Macbeth I assume – came across as gimmicky, cheapening the otherwise solid storyline.

Following a slow first half, a scene reminiscent of V for Vendetta blew away the cobwebs after the interval, with an intimidating group of ‘yobs’ protesting outside of the palace in Guy Fawkes masks. Sitting up a bit straighter in my seat, the storyline moved along enjoyably enough, building to a climactic, and ever-Shakespearean, almost tragic ending.

Whether it was to my taste or not, I can’t deny that the play offered some serious talking points on the walk home, providing audiences with a wholly possible outcome of King Charles’ reign, as well as raising some serious issues about feminism, freedom of speech, the need for the monarchy, and the slippery tongues of politicians.

Boasting a timely discussion of everything from the Bard’s anniversary year and a journalists’ right to write freely, to the inevitable death of the Queen and how – or who – will ascend the throne, King Charles III delivered an almost prophetic play, just not quite Shakespearean.


King Charles III will be at Everyman Theatre until Sunday 5 March 2016. For more information, see King Charles III at Everyman Theatre, call (01242) 572573 or visit everymantheatre.org.uk.


By Alice Lloyd

© SoGlos
Wednesday 02 March 2016

Your comments...

More reviews you might like...

SoGlos enjoyed sampling the brunch menu at The Hangar in Upper Rissington.

The Hangar review

Rating: 4/5

SoGlos jumped at the chance to indulge in a spot of brunch at The Hangar, a brand new Cotswold café located in Upper Rissington.

The team headed to Ian Coley’s shooting school to try out its Have-A-Go package.

SoGlos takes on Ian Coley's Have-A-Go shooting challenge

Rating: 4/5

There’s nothing like a bit of healthy competition to get a rainy Wednesday off to a sporting start, with SoGlos taking...

The five-strong cast worked seamlessly together during a flawless performance.

Abigail's Party at Everyman Theatre review

Rating: 5/5

With a splash of gin, a blast of Donna Summer, and the twinkle of fibre optic lights, Abigail’s Party breathed new life,...

Take a trip to the circus during Italian drama, La Strada.

La Strada review at Everyman Theatre

Rating: 4.5/5

Blending themes of love and loss with dazzling circus lights, La Strada transported audiences during a moving and mesmerising...

Liza Goddard excelled in the lead role of A Passionate Woman. © Anthony Thompson, Thousand Word Media.

A Passionate Woman at Everyman Theatre review

Rating: 4.5/5

Blending nostalgia, romance and comedy, A Passionate Woman triumphed in its humorous but honest portrayal of ageing, family...

Unmissable highlights