Sunday 25 October 2020

The Rise and Fall of Little Voice at The Barn Theatre review

Bringing the stage to life once again, The Barn Theatre captivated audiences with the timeless tale of The Rise and Fall of Little Voice, where you can expect striking talent, complex characters and fierce females who aren't to be reckoned with.

In a nutshell

Peppered with humour and a side note of slapstick silliness, The Rise and Fall of Little Voice brought larger-than-life characters to the stage; the incredible talent and dark story proves that The Barn Theatre means business and is a theatre to be taken seriously.


The review

A characterful cast


Filling the shoes of Jane Horrocks comes with a certain expectation that you’ve got something serious to bring to the table, and Sarah Louise Hughes who plays Little Voice, did just that.

Captivating audiences with an evocative aura of a young woman who’s sinking slowly into a world of isolation, Little Voice has an alluring sadness about her that instantly has you hoping she’ll get the break she deserves.

Painfully shy and desperately dreaming of the great talents on her vinyl records, Sarah Louise Hughes’ complex character unfolds as the story does. Her rising resistance to sing in shows growing, as her voice and talent starts to make itself heard.


Larger-than-life characters


Raucous comedy that had audiences erupting with laughter was, without doubt, the result of larger-than-life characters and an exceptional performance from Gillian McCafferty, who played Little Voice’s mother Mari.

With quick wit, questionable dance moves and a strong desire for a tipple or two, Mari fuses together her abusive treatment to her daughter, with the charm and charisma of a woman who’s desperate to fill the tragedy in her life with bountiful booze and affection from others.

Unravelling as the story continued, Gillian McCafferty’s character expertly switches from being cruel and craving a cure to the loss of her husband, to an explosively energetic live wire who you can’t help but like – even with her harsh ways and tongue-in-cheek humour intact.


Star of the show


Battling against her will, Little Voice is forced to take to the stage and sing… which by far surpasses what anyone is expecting. Striking vocals and an undeniable talent left us emerged in her world, goose bumps down our arms and heart in our throats as her character shone.

Performing iconic songs from the 20th century, Little Voice puts on a dazzling performance, stealing the stage and truly making the songs her own, much to the delight of her mother and her boyfriend, who are desperately after the dream of being rich and wealthy.

Crashing down in an emotional confrontation between Little Voice and her mother, the two characters stripped the stage of glitz, glamour and sparkle and had us wincing as they reveal the loss, sadness and relentless selfishness that ties them together – yet gives Little Voice the chance to finally become quite a fierce force after all.


SoGlos loves

Starring a host of exceptionally talented actors, The Rise and Fall of Little Voice gives audiences the chance to see stars of the stage in the intimate setting of Barn Theatre.


Top tip

With tickets expected to fly out in no time, don’t miss the chance to see Barn Theatre’s latest production and get your tickets quick!


What next?

For more information, see The Rise and Fall of Little Voice at The Barn Theatre, call (01285) 648240 or visit barntheatre.org.uk directly.

By Sophie Bird

© SoGlos
Thursday 12 July 2018

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