Sight-impaired Gloucestershire artist needs 100 people to take part in a new exhibition

Sarah Goddard, a sight-impaired artist from Gloucestershire, is looking for 100 people to help her create a mixed media abstract art piece for an exhibition in Cheltenham.

By Chloe Gorman  |  Published
People in Gloucestershire can take part in a collaborative art project with sight-impaired artist, Sarah Goddard, in February 2022.
People in Gloucestershire can take part in a collaborative art project with sight-impaired artist, Sarah Goddard, in February 2022.

Gloucestershire-based artist, Sarah Goddard, is looking for 100 people from the county to collaborate with her on a brand-new piece of artwork for her Room for Art project.

The sight-impaired artist wants to create a collaborative mixed media abstract art piece during her exhibition at Gardens Gallery in Cheltenham from Wednesday 2 to Tuesday 8 February 2022.

100 participants will have the opportunity to create a piece of abstract art using acrylic paint on MDF, with the final piece being a combination of all of the smaller artworks put together.

Goddard aims for the finished piece to achieve an abstract representation of the view from Leckhampton Hill across towards Cheltenham, showing the Devil’s Chimney, with the town and hills in the distance.

The artwork will be created at the Cheltenham gallery between Tuesday 2 and Sunday 6 February 2022, with timed slots available from 10am to 4pm each day.

The final piece will then be on display from Monday 7 to Tuesday 8 February 2022, before each individual participant’s piece is sent to them to keep, along with an image of the overall artwork.

Goddard said: ‘Art has benefits for all of us. I believe we can all be creative, but many people face barriers to taking part in art. I am looking for 100 people to take part with me to create an abstract work of art. You don’t have to have ever picked up a paint brush before to take part in creating this artwork.

‘As a sight-impaired artist, I have often felt like an imposter in the art world. I now recognise that we all see the world around us slightly differently from one another. My way of seeing and representing the world is just as valid as anyone else’s. There are a whole range of other reasons why people may not engage in creative activities.

‘Creating art has brought me great benefits, especially to my mental health. I would like to share these benefits with as many people as possible.’

No experience in painting is necessary to take part and the artist is providing all the materials needed.

As a disabled person, Goddard is also passionate about making her exhibition accessible for all, ensuring the gallery space has level access, creating audio descriptions of each artwork and creating an online version so anyone not able to attend in person can see the exhibition.

For more information, email sarahgoddardartist@yahoo.com.

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